SALARY: Should You Divulge Your Past Salary History?

Think carefully before divulging your past salary history in an interview. Many people think that by not doing so, it might prejudice an employer’s offer, so they gladly reveal their salary history if required, so as not to be disqualified.

Instead of trying to placate an interviewer, try to focus on projecting a clear impression of what’s important to you and what you’re worth. When you withhold your salary history, it forces a candidate and an employer to negotiate based on the candidate’s future value. Do you really want to get stuck defending what your last employer paid you?

This salary issue is more than a question of being cooperative. It’s about making sound judgments. In my opinion, an intelligent disagreement and discussion about salary reveals integrity and it stimulates an important dialogue. Employers who rely on salary history to judge you, are trusting another company’s evaluation of you. Think about that. It’s almost insane. What really matters is what you can do for this company now and in the future. Is the company able to make that judgment? Why does it need your last employer’s “salary input”?

Declining to divulge salary history is not about being uncooperative. It’s about shifting the interview to a higher plane. Don’t worry so much about getting disqualified. Any candidate can be cooperative, but few can demonstrate their value and get paid what they’re really worth. Your value lies in what you can do next; not in what somebody paid you to do last year. If you learn to hold your ground properly you will earn a manager’s respect, and maybe the offer you deserve.

Joyce welcomes any comments you have regarding the various topics addressed on the blog. Also, she would like you to ask any questions you might have that relate to a career transition. That way, she can address your needs, making sure you get relevant information to what matter most to you.

 

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