Posts Tagged ‘chamber of commerce’

What Am I Doing Wrong?

September 20, 2012

“What am I doing wrong?”

That question was asked of me last week by one of my new clients, a sales executive who’s been in a career transition for about a year now. This was our first coaching session. I gave him my honest answer…”I don’t know; let’s see what we can figure out.” I started by asking some routine yes/no questions to get a sense of what he knew about himself:

  • Can you speak about your product (you) with confidence and clarity? (He was unfamiliar with the concept of personal branding).
  • Do you know your product’s (your) strengths and flaws?
  • Can you describe your competitive advantage?
  • Do you have a clearly defined target goal?
  • Have you identified organizations that are aligned with your target goal?
  • Is your resume absolutely  a-m-a-z-i-n-g in educating the reader about you?
  • Do you make it easy for someone to interview you, or is it more like ping-pong with pain?
  • Can you name five things you do better than the next person?
  • Can you name five of your best attributes that will make a positive impact on the employer’s bottom line?
  • Can you cite five good reasons why somebody should hire you over your competition?
  • Have you been consistently networking, both in person and on the Internet?
  • Do you know the top 10 companies you would like to work for?

My client answered “no” to each of the questions. If you are looking for work in today’s competitive market, do yourself a favor; before you hit the streets, back up, rewind, and ask some hard, tough questions of yourself – be honest with yourself. Do you know what you are doing wrong when it comes to your job search? Would most of your answers to the above questions be “no” just like my client’s? When you can answer “yes” to these basic questions listed above, plus others, you’ll be well on your way to landing your next job. And I’d encourage you to start this process NOW, whether you are currently looking for a job or not. I suspect you will notice an immediate difference in how employers respond to you.

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Learn the “Right” Things To Do To Find a New Job

July 10, 2012

“The one who gets the job is NOT the best qualified, but the one who knows the most about getting a job.”

Richard Nelson Bolles, author of “What Color Is Your Parachute?

This is especially true in today’s challenging economy. It’s those who know what techniques to use and how to use them that are getting jobs ahead of their peers. For those of you who are currently in a job search, you are finding out that what worked in the past is not working now.

Do you know what job search techniques work the best? Do you know where to spend your time and efforts so that you are working on things that are effective instead of spinning your wheels? Here are some tips that will help:

  • Companies and recruiters look for candidates on LinkedIn (30 million members) and other online sites such as Indeed and Simply Hired.
  • Each job seeker must have a prominent/professional online presence
  • Every “professional” site needs a “Value Statement” that clearly shows the value you bring to a company

Use multiple channels in your job search:

Job Boards – Monster / Career Builder, etc. – about 5″ of people get jobs through job boards

Social Networking – make sure you are on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter’

  1. It’s critical that your profile on each reflect the message you want conveyed (your value)
  2. Think in terms of what employers are looking for
  3. Join niches within LinkedIn and other online groups that apply specifically to what you want, such as accounting groups, IT groups, sales groups, etc.
  4. Visit professional association websites that relate to the type of job you want, like ASTD, FENG, etc.
  5. Check out groups on the Women for Hire website – it’s not just for women!

In-Person Networking – local BNI, Chamber of Commerce, NETSHARE, MCC and job fairs

  1. Learn how to strike up conversations with people you don’t know. I struck up a conversation at a Chamber of Commerce meeting that could lead to me doing part-time coaching for a local university.
  2. Think about specific topics you could discuss so you wont’ feel so overwhelmed when you are actually with a group of people.

Target specific companies – Decide on 5-10 companies where you’d like to work and find out all you can about them. Find out their pain (where they need help) and show them how you can help.

  1. Avoid the “black hole” in a company. Find a referral or contact in the company and make a verbal/email contact to try to get a referral.
  2. Decide what companies interest you. For instance, would you prefer to work for a company founded by private equity or venture capital, would you prefer to work for a large public company, or a small privately held company, a forward-thinking, fast-paced company, or a time-honored, deliberate company, a regulated or non-regulated company?
  3. Research your ideal job and then find and talk with people who hold the kind of job you want.

Bottom line: Job search is all about networking and getting an internal contact to recommend you!

 

10 Secrets to Finding a Job – Despite a Scarce Job Market

January 12, 2010

Every time we turn on the news, we seem to be bombarded with discouraging news about the job market. However, there are open positions that can be found, with persistence. Here are 10 ways you can stay positive and greatly increase your chances for great results. When you take action toward something you want, you remain more positive and feel more in control of the situation.

  1. Strive to be the best in your profession – Demonstrate at every opportunity how you can add value to an organization. Show what distinguishes you from your competition. This applies whether you are currently looking for a job, or whether you already have one.
  2. Brand yourself – How are you unique? What are your strengths? Who is your target audience? Do you have a personal brand statement? If you’re not sure about the answers to these questions, take the time to reflect on them so you know just what VALUE you offer a new employer, or your current employer.
  3. Network constantly and consistently – Join Internet networking groups such as LinkedIn and FaceBook. Also, join local and national professional organizations, such as your local Chamber of Commerce, or the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), to name a few.
  4. Develop a relationship with a recruiter – especially one that works in your field. Being in their database isn’t enough, you want to be the one that comes to mind when they have a position for which you’d qualify.
  5. Think about freelancing – Become more entrepreneurial, whether you work for yourself or someone else. Visit sologig.com. This is a site that hosts jobs just for freelancers and contractors.
  6. If you are out of work, join a support group – The Career Conquerors Job Club or the Job Hunters Success Coaching Club – either one is a terrific place to start. Each week people support one other and provide leads and advice to others in the group.
  7. Embrace change – Keep your job skills up to date. Create a personal website, or at least a great profile (ask about the 60 Second Commercial) on websites such as LinkedIn and FaceBook. Take a class.
  8. Prepare for an evolving job market – Look for trends in the job market where there is increased hiring. Growth industries include health care, education, and green living, to name a few.
  9. Your resume is what gets you interviews – Make sure it shows the type of position you want, how you have the skill set for that type of position, and how you have used your skills to make a difference in the various jobs you have held. It must show VALUE, and it must look great, so an employer will pick up the phone and call you.
  10. Make sure your credentials and skill set matches the employers job requirements – Pay attention to the employer’s requirements or job posting – you should match about 75 – 80% of what they want.